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      Famous & Infamous Albertans

    ABERHART, William

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    AKERS, Dave

      Akers and his partner, Liver-eating Johnston, built the Spitzee Post, an early whiskey trading fort. The fort was destroyed by the Blackfoot soon after it was built. Akers was a whiskey trader until the NWMP arrived at Fort Whoop-Up in 1874 where Akers was in charge. He then went into ranching with a partner nearby. He shot his partner a few years later and ended up serving 3 years in the Fort Macleod jail.

      Source:

      • Alberta History Along the Highway by Ted Stone

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    ALBERTA, Princess Louise Caroline

      The province of Alberta is named after Princess Louise Caroline Alberta, fourth daughter of Queen Victoria and wife of the Marquis of Lorne, one of Canada's Governor Generals.

      See: Legislative Assembly of Alberta Bio

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    ARCHIBALD, Sir Adams G.

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    BARTELLE, Eleanor

      Eleanor Bartelle nee Jones born in Magic District, Alberta to Mr. and Mrs. John O. Jones. She married Jack Fowler. She joined the Mart Kenny Band (Mart Kenny and the Western Gentlemen) at the Royal York Hotel in 1936. She was with the Band for 1936, 1937 and 1938. She resigned her spot with the Band when she became pregnant. She was replaced by Georgia Dey from Edmonton, Alberta. She got her stage name "Bartelle" from Jack Radford, Manager of the CBC, Vancouver, BC. Jack Radford and the Mart Kenny Band were at the Banff Springs Hotel for a CBC Broadcast when Mr. Radford suggested that "Bartelle" would be a more colourful name than Jones. Eleanor Bartelle is pictured with Mart Kenny and the Western Gentlemen on page 51 of Mart Kenny's book "Mart Kenny and the Western Gentlemen" written many years ago. Eleanor Bartelle died many years ago. This information is courtesy of a conversation with Mr. Mart Kenny (age 90) , July 11, 2001 at Mission, BC.

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    BOWEN, John C.

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    BOWLEN, John J.

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    BRETT, Robert G.

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    BROWN, John George

      John George Brown known as "Kootenai Brown" was born and educated in Britian. He served with the British Army in India in the 1850's but was attracted to British Columbia by rumours of gold and arrived there in 1861 where he worked as a miner and constable. Later he was a buffalo hunter in Manitoba, then a pony express rider for the US Army. He was captured by Indians and after his escape moved to Montana where he married a Metis woman, Olive Lyonais. In 1877 he was arrested for killing a fur trader at Fort Benton and was acquitted. Later that same year he moved his family to Waterton Lakes, then known as Kootenai Lakes. Here he ran a trading post and acted as a guide for many years. During the Riel Rebellion he served as a scout for the Rocky Mountain Rangers. He was instrumental in the Waterton Park area becoming a National Park and served as the first park warden until he died in 1916.

      Sources:

      • Heritage Hunter's Guide to Alberta Museums by Roberta Hursey

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    BROWNLEE, John E.

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    BULYEA, George H. V.

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    CAMERON, Malcolm C.

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    COCHRANE, Dave

      Dave Cochrane came west as a Mountie and stayed after his tour of duty ended at Fort Macleod. His first homestead was located in the Blood Indian Reserve and when the Indians complained he left the homestead but claimed improvements from the government and he received $3,500 from the Indian department for a one room cabin. His next homestead was located on the Walrond Ranch lease where he also received 'compensation' for improvements. He was well known for his collection of junk and old parts which he would sell if the price was right.

      Source:

      • Alberta History Along the Highway by Ted Stone

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    COCHRANE, Matthew

      Senator Matthew Cochrane was the first of the big leasehold ranchers in Alberta. He leased 100,000 acres of land from the government for under one cent an acre. His first herd of 3,000 cattle arrived from Montana late in the fall. After a hard drive and before they had time to regain their strength, the ranch was hit with a hard winter and many of the cattle died. Cochrane purchased another 4,000 head of cattle the following year, 1882, but this herd fared no better and by the end of the second winter Cochrane had lost more than half of his original 7,000 cattle. Cochrane decided to move his cattle south and leased another 100,000 acres near what is now Waterton Park. The north ranch was used for sheep and horses. The following year found Cochrane plagued with further losses. Evenutally the Cochrane Ranch recovered but by the early 1900's open-range ranching in Alberta was over.

      Sources:

      • Alberta History Along the Highway by Ted Stone

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    CROWFOOT, Chief

      Chief Crowfoot was born in southern Alberta in about 1830. He was known by several names including Bear Ghost, and Shot Close. His courage as a young warrior caused him to be made a chief of one of the Indian bands. In 1870 he became one of the three head chiefs of the Blackfoot Confederacy. The chief was a friend of Father Lacombe and Colonel Macleod of the NWMP. It was Chief Crowfoot who influenced the starving and diseased Blackfoot Indians to sign Treaty #7 in 1877, bowing to the inevitable, he ceded the Quenn 50,000 square miles of fertile land. In 1885, Crowfoot convinced his tribe not to join the Riel Rebellion after visiting Winnipeg. On April 25, 1890 he died of turberculosis at Blackfoot Crossing.

      Sources:

      • Heritage Hunter's Guide to Alberta Museums by Roberta Hursey

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    DAVIS, Henry

      Henry Davis, better known as 'Twelve Foot Davis' got his nickname when he struck it rich in the British Columbia gold fields on a 12 foot wide claim where he managed to extract about $15,000 in gold. In 1865 he arrived in the Peace country and set up a trading post across from Fort Dunvegan, the first of many along the Peace River. He died in 1900 and was buried at Lesser Slave Lake but his friend, 'Peace River Jim' Cornwall had his remains moved to Grouard Hill overlooking the town of Peace River.

      Sources:

      • Heritage Hunter's Guide to Alberta Museums by Roberta Hursey

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    DEWDNEY, Edgar

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    DUBOIS, Jack

      Jack Dubois settled on Big Knife Creek near Galahad when he arrived in Alberta from the United States in 1902. Here, he organized a gang of cattle thieves who stole cattle from the local ranchers and added them to their own herds after altering the brands. In 1909, after an intensive investigation by the Royal North West Mounted Police, two of the members of Dubois' gang, the Holt brothers,  were arrested while he escaped. He was later arrested while trying to board a train at Lacombe. The Holt's received a nine year sentence each while Dubois got only nine months. The Crown appealed the ruling, the first one ever appealed in Alberta, and the Supreme Court overruled the decision. At his next trial Dubois was sentenced to five years. On appeal the charges were thrown out and Dubois was released.

      Source:

      • Heritage Hunter's Guide to Alberta Museums by Roberta Hursey

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    EDWARDS, Bob

      Bob Edwards arrived in Alberta in 1895 and started newspapers in several towns including Wetaskiwin, Leduc, Edmonton and High River. He finally moved to Calgary where he published the Eye-Opener, a satirical and irreverant publication that arrived on newstands on an irregular basis. The newspaper was a success and, despite his opinions of politicians, was elected to the provincial legislature with no campaigning. Edwards became ill and died shortly after his first parliamentary session.

      Sources:

      • Alberta History Along the Highway by Ted Stone

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    EGBERT, William

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    FAIRFIELD, William

      William Fairfield came to Alberta from Wyoming in the early 1900's to farm. Until his arrival farmers in southern Alberta were unable to grow alfalfa, a significant problem for early farmers. Fairfield, who had been an agriculture professor at the University of Wyoming, arranged to have a bag of Wyoming dirt from an alfalfa field sent to him. This dirt was spread around his alfalfa field which produced a healthy alfalfa crop the following year. Soil from this field was used on other fields in the area. The Alberta Rail and Irrigation Company heard about Fairfield and hired him to set up an experimental station to improve irrigation techniques. This farm became the Agriculture Research Station at Lethbridge.

      Source:

      • Alberta History Along the Highway by Ted Stone

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    FIDLER, Peter

      Peter Fidler was born in 1769 in England and came to Canada in 1787 to work for the Hudson's Bay Company where he helped establish Buckingham House on the North Saskatchewan River. In November of 1792 he set out with some Piegans to explore the prairies. He was the first white person to take compass bearings on the Rocky Mountains. He discovered coal along the banks of the Red Deer River. In 1802 Fidler was sent to establish posts in the Athabasca and Peace countries. These posts were Nottingham House on Lake Athabasca and Mansfield House on the Peace River. Peter Fidler died in 1822.

      Sources:

      • Heritage Hunter's Guide to Alberta Museums by Roberta Hursey

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    FORGET, Amédée E.

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    GAETZ, Dr. Leonard

      In 1884, Dr. Leonard Gaetz, a Methodist preacher, came from Ontario with his wife and ten children and were one of the first families to settle in the area of the Red Deer Crossing. When the railway line from Calgary to Edmonton was to pass through the area, Mr. Gaetz offered the CPR one half interest in his large farm causing Red Deer Crossing to be bypassed. Today this CPR crossing is downtown Red Deer.

      Source:

      • Heritage Hunter's Guide to Alberta Museums by Roberta Hursey

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    GALT, Elliott T.

      Elliott Galt was the son of Sir Alexander Galt who was one of the fathers of confederation. As an Assistant Indian Commissioner in 1880, at the age of 30,  he had the opportunity to visit Sheran's coal mine, now Lethbridge. Realizing the potential of the rich coal deposits in the area he had his father organize British investors who formed the North West Coal and Navigation Company in 1882 after the CPR decided to cross southern Alberta to the Pacific coast. Elliott Galt moved to Lethbridge where he managed the NWC & NCo. They first ferryed the coal by barge on the river, then constructed a railway from Coalbanks (Lethbridge) to Dunmore on the CPR mainline. For many years this company was the largest coal producer in the NWT. In 1905 ill health forced Mr Galt to give up active management of the company and he moved from Lethbridge.

      Source:

      • Heritage Hunter's Guide to Alberta Museums by Roberta Hursey

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    GETTY, Donald R.

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    GLENN, John

      John Glenn settled on Fish Creek near the Elbow River about 1873. A few years later he was irrigating 20 acres of his land with Fish Creek water, the first irrigated crops in Alberta.

      Source:

      • Alberta History Along the Highway by Ted Stone

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    GREENFIELD, Herbert

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    HARMER, William 'Silent Bill'

      Known as Silent Bill Harmer, he represented Edmonton in the Senate. He is of Sussex England Harmer stock, the family came over to Kingston, Ontario in 1836 and most of them finished up working for the rail roads. William's line moved to Napanee, Ontario, just west of Kingston - at age 19 he went west to Alberta, was the station agent at Canmore when he married in 1895 or 1898. He eventually became deputy minister for railways in Alberta - a big friend of Sifton. He had one daughter who died young, his wife left him and she died in Victoria at quite an old age. When Sifton came to power he put Bill Harmer into the Senate around 1918 and he stayed there until 1947 when he died - he still represented Alberta but lived in Ottawa and Napanee and seldom went back to Alberta - much to their chagrin. He was called "Silent" Bill because in all those years in the Senate he only spoke 89 words but he was there for every vote and was a good member in that respect.

      Source:

      • Ron Harmer

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    HATFIELD, Charles Mallory

      In the spring of 1921 a group of farmers near Medicine Hat arranged for Hatfield to come north from California where he had some fame as a rainmaker. Hatfield built a cabin and pair of towers near an alkali slough called Chappice Lake. In May crops got off to a good start with nearly 1.5 inches of rain. More rain fell in June but in July farmers once more had dry fields. With criticism mounting, Hatfield accepted $2,500, somewhat less than his original fee, and headed for home.

      Source:

      • Alberta History Along the Highway by Ted Stone

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    HAULTAIN, Sir Frederick W.A.G.

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    HERRON, William

      William Herron's Calgary Petroleum Products Company is credited with the discovery of Alberta's first major oil and gas field near Turner Valley in 1914. Herron was a rancher from Ontario who was interested in petroleum geology and began exploration drilling near Turner Valley after encountering some oil seepage in the area.

      Source:

      • Alberta History Along the Highway by Ted Stone

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    HOLE, Lois E.

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    HUNLEY, W. Helen

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    JOHNSON, Sir Francis G.

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    KLEIN, Ralph

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    KWARAKWANTE, Louis

      Louis arrived in the Grande Cache area around 1811 with his brother Ignace and Ignace Wanyande. He had two wives and twelve children. In 1845 he met with Father De Smet at Jasper House and Louis, having not seen a priest for nearly 40 years, had the father baptise his 36 children and grandchildren. Louis Kwarakwante, an Iriquois Indian, was best known as a trapper, hunter, guide, and packer in the Athabasca Valley.

      Sources:

      • Heritage Hunter's Guide to Alberta Museums by Roberta Hursey

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    LACOMBE, Father Albert

      Father Albert Lacombe was a party to most major historical events in Alberta's history during  the last half of the nineteenth century. He was born in Quebec and ordained in 1849. That same year he was sent to the Canadian west to minister to the Metis people, Cree and Blackfoot Indians. His first few years were spent fravelling by horseback and Red River Cart as the Metis made their annual treks for the buffalo hunt. In 1852 he was sent to the Lac Ste. Anne mission. Father Lacombe founded new missions at St. Albert, St. Paul des Metis, Dunbar, Pincher Creek, Midnapore and Calgary. His mission field extended from Pincher Creek to St. Albert, a distance of 300 miles north to south. He died in 1916 at the age of 89 and is buried on Mission Hill in St. Albert. The Indians called him an Indian name meaning 'Noble Soul'.

      Sources:

      • Heritage Hunter's Guide to Alberta Museums by Roberta Hursey

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    LAIRD, David

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    LAPOINTE, Jean Baptiste - PEOCUS

      1811?-1936
      There are numerous history books that have mentioned Peocus in one form or another, be it a direct quote from him, or the history that he'd passed on . Peocus was considered to be an honest man , with very good moral standards, as well as a religious man in his latter 50 years or so, and became well known as a long time resident of Camrose.  Although Peocus had a colourful beginning in life as a paigan in the Cree band, his latter years were very active in the church , and he befriended many settlers in the Camrose area , who knew of him only as "Pe-O-Kis". Peocus was born south of Fort Pitt, at Yellow Hill, about 2 miles north of the Battle River. His son, Louis Lapointe, was born on the west side of Salt Lake, about 26 miles north - east of Camrose.  There are a number of Lapointe family members listed on the interment list of Duhamel, that date back as early as 1886.

      The old Indian was a freighter as well as a hunter. The last buffalo killed by him was while on a freighting trip from Edmonton to Winnipeg. On the twentieth day out of Edmonton they were camped along the trail to the south and east of Nose Hill, about thirty miles east of where Coronation now stands. In the morning they spied some buffalo in a coulee east of them. The party including Jack Norrish, Don McLeod, Joe McDonald, Ed McPherson  and Peocus, taking after them killing four old bulls and a two year old calf. The group camped on the spot for several days, ate their fill of fresh meat and dried the balance to serve them on their long trek to Winnipeg. Some of the meat they traded at the forks (the junction of the Red Deer and South Saskatchewan Rivers), to Metis' who lived there, for flour , tea, sugar and other things needed for the trip. Peocus made four such trips to Winnipeg with freight, leaving Edmonton with the disappearance of snow in the spring and returning with the snow in the fall.

      In an interview with Frank Farley just prior to Peocus' death, using Louis Lapointe as an interpreter, Peocus mentions an occasion during his youth where he was included along with a party of thirteen Metis' left their camp near Nose Hill and started south on a horse raiding expedition. Passing about ten miles west of Hand Hills and proceeding in a southerly direction they crossed the Red Deer River, the entire party on foot. Finding a shallow fording place and using a pole to support them in the swiftly flowing stream , they successfully navigated the river and went on south living on berries and the occasional antelope. All wore moccasins and they carried no blankets.

      After crossing several streams they came to a large coulee where on the flats below they detected a number of teepees but with no sign of life- no men, no dogs and no horses. Staking out the flat for two days they eventually got up sufficient courage to enter the camp. When they entered the camp they were startled to discover men, women and children lying dead in their blankets. They quickly rolled the dead off the blankets, folded the latter and took off in a haste pleased that they would at least have something to show for their endeavors.

      Making camp that night at some distance from the deserted camp, one of the group suggested that the deaths of the band might have been caused by that dreaded disease , Smallpox. Immediately the would be raiders tossed away their blankets and took off in a haste for home.

      Nearing a camp east of Nose Hill, the raiders were welcomed by members of their own group who were about to take off in search of the missing party. When informed that they may have been subjected to the disease, the band treated the group with well deserved respect. Unfortunately, eleven of the thirteen succumbed to the fatal disease but Peocus who had become ill, recovered. It has been mentioned that after recovering, Peocus had checked both the Pretty Hill Camp, and the Lake Demay , finding both camps almost totally wiped out from smallpox.  Shortly after this tragic episode, Peocus, along with twenty of the band journeyed to Brousseau on the North Saskatchewan River where they met Father Lacombe and all were baptized. Peocus was baptized with the name "Jean-Baptiste Lapointe" about 75 years before his death.

      Peocus lived at one time in his life in a hut just north and west of the St. Thomas Church of Duhamel, along the south bank of Battle River. He was a good friend and a faithful follower of Father Bellevaire and lived in the small hut adjacent to the one occupied by the Reverand Father when he first came to the Laboucane Settlement. Their friendship is noted in many documents. Peocus lived out his long life, of which is reported to be more than 125 years, in a small cabin north of the C.P.R. tracks in Camrose. Peocus' son, Louis Lapointe, at the time of Louis's applying for his old age pension, received a copy of his birth certificate, stating " Louis Lapointe, born 1872, out on the prairie". Apparently Peocus and his family were camped near Salt Lake at the time of Louis's birth.

      In the article written at the time of Peocus's passing, his sister, Marie- Rose Ladoux of Vermillion, is mentioned as still being alive. Peocus passed away April 28, 1936 in his cabin in Camrose at the age of 125 years old.

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    LEITCH, Marian

      Baby Marian Leitch was one of the most miraculous survivals of the Frank Slide disaster. She was thrown from the top story of her home when the side of Turtle Mountain crushed the Frank community on April 29, 1903. A neighbor heard her cries and found her in a hay pile several yards from the home where her parents and four brothers were killed. Two of her sisters had been rescued in the hours after the slide.

      Source:

      • Heritage Hunter's Guide to Alberta Museums by Roberta Hursey

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    LOUGHEED, E. Peter

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    LYNCH-STAUNTON, Frank C.

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    MacEWAN, J. W. Grant

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    MacKINTOSH, Charles C.

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    MacLEOD, James F.

      Col. James Farquharson Macleod was born in Scotland in 1836. In 1860 he became a practicing lawyer in Ontario, then joined the military and served during the Red River expedition. He joined the NWMP in 1873 and led his troops to roust the whiskey traders and establish Fort MacLeod in what is now southern Alberta. In 1875 MacLeod became a NWT magistrate, shortly thereafter he was named a NWMP commissioner and held both posts until 1880. Col. MacLeod continued his judicial work, his district was the area of Fort Walsh, Fort Macleod, Fort Calgary and Edmonton with courts held in other places along the way. In 1887 he was appointed to the supreme court of the NWT and held this position until his death in 1894. He had the reputation, to both white and Indian, of always keeping his word.

      Sources:

      • Heritage Hunter's Guide to Alberta Museums by Roberta Hursey

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    MANNING, Ernest C.

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    McDOUGALL, George & John

      Rev. George McDougall, a Methodist minister, came to Edmonton from Ontario with his sons in 1862. They built their first Methodist mission at Victoria and worked there until 1871. By 1875 they had established the Morley Mission. Unfortunately he was frozen to death in a blizzard near Calgary in the 1876. His son, Rev. John McDougall founded the first protestant church in the Calgary district and imported the first breeding cattle to southern Alberta to help finance his missionary work. John died at Calgary in 1916.

      Sources:

      • Heritage Hunter's Guide to Alberta Museums by Roberta Hursey

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    McDOUGALL, Sir William

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    McKINNEY, Louise Crummy

      Louise McKinney moved from Ontario, where she was born in 1868, to the Claresholm area with her family in 1903. She was the founder and president of the Women's Christian Temperance Movement and fought for prohibition, social reform and women's suffrage. She is best remembered as one of the 'Famous Five' Alberta women who lobbied to get women declared as 'persons' under the British North America Act in 1928.

      Sources:

      • Heritage Hunter's Guide to Alberta Museums by Roberta Hursey

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    McNAUGHT, Mathew

      Mathew McNaught was one of the first white settlers in Southern Alberta, building a homestead on land east of Willow Creek and south-west of The Leavings, now Granum.  He had previously been running bull trains for I.G. Baker Freight, carrying supplies between Fort Benton, Montana and Fort Macleod, Alberta until the arrival of the railway in Calgary in 1883.  In 1885, Mathew was called into service with the Rocky Mountain Rangers, This group, known as the "Cowboy Cavalry," was composed of cowboys, ex-mounted policemen, ranchers, settlers and trappers who were banded together to guard the ranch country and its inhabitants in the event that the Northwest Rebellion should spread to involve the Blackfoot tribes or the American Indian raiding parties.  They contributed greatly to the maintenance of peace and order in the vast ranch country.  Mathew later acquired more land in Porcupine Hills for livestock and farming. Born in Scotland in 1849, Mathew was active in community life and a member of the Masonic Order.  He died in Granum in 1925.

      Sources:

      • The Rocky Mountain Rangers by Gordon E. Tolton

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    MICHENER, Roland

      Michener was born in Lacombe and raised in Alberta. Graduating form the U of A he received a scholarship to Oxford where he met and became friends with Lester Pearson. Michener practiced law in Ontario and became a provincial member of parliament in 1946 and a federal member of parliament in 1953. He lost the election in 1962 and, after a few years as commissioner to India, was appointed Governor General of Canada by Prime Minister Lester Pearson.

      Sources:

      • Alberta History Along the Highway by Ted Stone

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    MORRIS, Sir Alexander

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    OLSON, H. A. "Bud"

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    PAGE, J. Percy

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    PARLBY, Irene (Marryat)

      Irene Parlby, an accomplished pianist who had studied in England & Germany, was born in England in 1868 of an upper-middle class family. In 1896 she arrived at the Westhead Ranch near Buffalo Lake to visit a friend. she met Walter Parlby and they were married the following year. Their first home was a sod shack. In 1913 she joined the Women's Club in Alix, this later became the United Farm Women of Alberta Local #1, where she served as president until 1919. For the next two years she was on the Board of Governors of the University of Alberta. In 1921 she was nominated as a candidate in the Lacombe constituency and won the seat becoming the second woman in the history of the British Commonwealth to have such a position. She became one of the 'Famous Five' who, in 1929, fought to have women delcared as persons by the Supreme Court. In 1930 she was part of the Canadian delegation to the League of Nations. Mrs Parlby died in 1965.

      Source:

      • Heritage Hunter's Guide to Alberta Museums by Roberta Hursey

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    PHILLIPS, Donald 'Curly'

      Curly Phillips, born in 1884, came west from Ontario in 1908 and worked as a packer for the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway. The following year he climbed Mt. Robson with Rev. George Kinney, although this climb was never officially recognized as the first successful climb as they missed the summit by a few yards. Phillips had never climbed a mountain before this time. Curly, and the Metis he hired, guided tourist and hunters into the remote areas of Jasper Park. In the 1930's he built a boathouse at Maligne Lake and remained there until he was killed by an avalanche in Elysium Pass in 1938. Mt. Phillips if named for Donald 'Curly' Phillips.

      Source:

      • Heritage Hunter's Guide to Alberta Museums by Roberta Hursey

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    PICARIELLO, Emilio

      In about 1911, Emilio Picariello, a Sicilian who immigrated to Canada at the turn of the Century, moved to the Crowsnest Pass area. The hotel he owned in Blairmore became a front for the largest rum running operation in southern Alberta when the province was 'dry' from 1916 to 1923. Picariello's son was shot and wounded when he tried to run after being stopped at an Alberta Provincial Police roadblock. Hearing that his son had been shot, Picariello who was in a separate vehicle at the roadblock shot and killed an unarmed constable, Steve Lawson. He and his accomplice, Mrs Florence Lassandro, were arrested for murder, convicted and hanged at the Fort Saskatchewan prison in May of 1923. This case, highly publicized, was instrumental in bringing an end to the eight years of prohibition in Alberta.

      Source:

      • Heritage Hunter's Guide to Alberta Museums by Roberta Hursey

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    POND, Peter

      Peter Pond was born in Conneticutt in 1740 and came to Canada about 1775 after serving in the British Colonial army, the French and Indian Wars, and having various adventures abroad. He was the first white man to cross the 12 mile Methy Portage and go down the Clearwater and Athabasca Rivers. Pond established the first trading post in what is now Alberta about 30 miles from Lake Athabasca on the Athabasca River. Peter Pond sold his interest in the North West Company and left Canada forever in 1790. He spent the rest of his years adventuring along the Mississippi, then returned to Connecticutt where he died in 1807.

      Sources:

      • Heritage Hunter's Guide to Alberta Museums by Roberta Hursey

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    POTTS, Jeremy 'Jerry'

      Jerry Potts was born in about 1840 to a Scottish and Blood Indian ancestry. He was a Metis guide and plainsman, with an uncanny sense of direction, who led the Northwest Mounted Police to Fort Whoop-Up from Fort Benton, Montana. He also picked the location for the first NWMP post, called Fort Macleod. Potts was buried at Fort Macleod with full honors in 1896 having served with the NWMP for 22 years and being given the rank of special constable.

      Sources:

      • Heritage Hunter's Guide to Alberta Museums by Roberta Hursey

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    PRIMROSE, Philip C.H.

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    REID, Richard G.

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    ROWAND, John

      John Rowand was born in Montreal in 1789. In 1803 he began to work as an apprentice for the North West Company. By 1821 he was Chief Trader at Rocky Mountain House. He pioneered the Fort Assiniboine - Fort Edmonton Trail and he was appointed, by Governor George Simpson, as Chief Factor of the Saskatchewan District at Fort Edmonton from 1826 until 1854 when he died. Rowand died on a trip to Fort Pitt when he tried to break up a brawl between his boatmen. He was buried at Fort Pitt until Governor Simpson learned of his wish to be buried in Montreal. His remained were exhumed, rendered of all flesh, packaged and taken to Governor Simpson at Norway House where he took charge of the package. Rowands remains were repacked at the Red River Settlement and sent on to York Factory where they were placed on a ship for England. Four years after his death, in 1858, he was finally buried in the Mount Royal Cemetery in Montreal.

      Sources:

      • Heritage Hunter's Guide to Alberta Museums by Roberta Hursey

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    ROYAL, Joseph

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    RUNDLE, Robert

      Rev. Robert Rundle, the pioneer missionary, reached Edmonton House in September of 1840, from there he went to Rocky Mountain House where he arrived in February of 1841. In April of 1841, Mr. Rundle camped at the foot of Cascade Mountain in Banff for over a month. Rundle Mountain was named in honor of this missionary trek.

      Source:

      • Heritage Hunter's Guide to Alberta Museums by Roberta Hursey

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    RUTHERFORD, Alexander Cameron

      Premier of Alberta 1905-1910
      Alexander Cameron Rutherford became Alberta's first premier in 1905 when Alberta became a province of Canada. His liberal party took 23 of 25 seats in this first election. Mr. Rutherford was born in Ontario of Scottish parents and educated at McGill University. After practicing law in Ottawa and Kemptville Ontario he moved to Strathcona in 1895. In 1902 he was elected speaker of the Territorial Assembly. In 1910 Rutherford resigned as premier after a prolonged debate about the controversial railway policy. His major accomplishment was his work to establish the University of Alberta in 1907 where he served as chancellor from 1927 until his death in 1941.

      See: Legislative Assembly of Alberta Bio

      Source:

      • Various sources

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    SIFTON, Arthur

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    SITTING BULL

      Sitting Bull, along with 500 Sioux, arrived in Canada after the Sioux Indians he and Crazy Horse were leading, killed General George Custer and his 265 men at the Battle of Little Big Horn. He had fled over the Canadian border where they would be safe from the US army. Over the next five years the NWMP managed to keep the Sioux warriors under control. In 1879 the government decided that the Sioux were 'American Indians', although they had historically ranged back and forth across the 49th parallel and worked toward having them ousted from Canada. The Canadian government refused to sign any treaties with the Sioux and would give them no land or food. Finally, in 1881, Sitting Bull led his starving people south. Nine years later Sitting Bull and eight of his followers were killed resisting arrest.

      Sources:

      • Alberta History Along the Highway by Ted Stone

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    STEINHAUER, Ralph G.

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    STEWART, Charles

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    STROM, Harry E.

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    THOMPSON, David

      David Thompson, surveyor and explorer, made the earliest detailed map of Alberta. He was born in London in 1770 and arrived on the prairies at the age of 16 to work with James Gaddy for the Hudsons Bay Company as a fur trader and surveyor. In 1797 he left the Hudson's Bay Company and joined the Northwest Company. At 29 he married Charlotte Small, a Metis. She travelled with Thompson as he explored and had 13 children. His base became Rocky Mountain House as he began to search for a route to the Pacific. Between 1807 and 1812 he surveyed the Kootenay and Columbia Rivers and established posts. David Thompson died in 1857.

      Sources:

      • Heritage Hunter's Guide to Alberta Museums by Roberta Hursey

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    TOWERS, T. Gordon

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    WALSH, William L.

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    WARE, John

      John Ware was born to slavery in about 1850 on a cotton plantation in South Carolina. At the end of the Civil War he moved to Texas and learned to ride a horse and drive cattle. Ware joined a cattle drive to move a herd of Texas longhorns to Montana. In 1882 Tom Lynch persuaded Ware and his friend, Bill Moody, to come to Canada and work on the Bar U Ranche near the Highwood River. He earned a reputation as a horseman by riding the worst bucker in the remuda, then became even more famous as he tracked down some rustlers and brought them back to the ranch. He worked for other ranches in southern Alberta before he started his own on Sheep Creek, near Millarville. In 1892 he married the daughter of a black farmer from Ontario and in 1903 he moved north of Brooks on the Red Deer River near the town of Dutchess. John's wife died in 1905 and, a short time later, he was killed when his horse rolled on him after a fall.

      Sources:

      • Heritage Hunter's Guide to Alberta Museums by Roberta Hursey

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    WILSON, Tom

      Tom Wilson, in 1881, at the age of 22 years, was the only person to volunteer to accompany Major A.B. Rogers to explore Kicking Horse Pass for the CPR and to try to find Roger's nephew, Albert, who had gotten lost. Wilson's fame began with his finding Albert four days after he and Rogers left their Bow Valley camp. Such discoveries as Lake Louise, Marble Canyon and Emerald Lake are credited to Tom Wilson. Wilson began operating a outfitting business in Banff in 1885 and for 25 years he was an outfitter and guide.

      Sources:

      • Heritage Hunter's Guide to Alberta Museums by Roberta Hursey

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    WRAY, Fay

      Vina Fay Wray was born September 15, 1907 in Alberta, Canada. Fay Wray made her film debut in Gasoline Love (1923), but it was her lead role in The Wedding March (1928) that made her a star. She became a cult figure after here role in King Kong (1933), as the beauty captured by a giant gorilla. Fay starred in many other productions, opposite such leading men as Gary Cooper, Ronald Colman, Fredric March, William Powell, and Richard Arlen. In 1942 she married screenwriter Robert Riskin and retired from the screen. She made a comeback in the 50s, before she finally retired in 1958.

      Source:

      • Online
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